Fachbereich 7

Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaft


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From Morality to Parody: Jane Austen’s Early Novels


DozentIn: Hannah Erk

Veranstaltungstyp: Seminar

Ort: 22/104

Zeiten: Di. 16:00 - 18:00 (wöchentlich)

Beschreibung: Jane Austen started writing at a very young age. Her juvenilia are marked by parodies of genres and works popular during her youth. Traces of this playful engagement with literature can be seen especially in her first novel Northanger Abbey. Her second novel, Sense and Sensibility appears to be the work of a more mature writer, although it is—at least by some critics—regarded as a bit clumsy in comparison with Austen’s later novels. In spite of, or rather, due to this short-sighted perspective on Austen’s early oeuvre, this course will explore both the novels themselves and the political, social, as well as cultural background in which they were created. This entails gaining a more profound understanding about the evolution of the novel as a popular literary genre and engaging in the reception history of the works from the time of their original publication until today. The course structure aims at providing the students with various perspectives on the novels, like, for example, feminist or Marxist readings. Therefore, the sessions will consist of in-depth discussions of the novels, engagement with secondary literature, and watching film adaptations of the novels that give us an impression of Austen’s status as a writer today.
Course requirements:
• Reading the primary and secondary texts as assigned on the schedule
• Be prepared for each session
• Participating in group works and classroom discussions
• For 4 LP: writing a term paper (4000-5000 words)
Concerning the primary sources, students can use any copy of the novels. Secondary Sources will be provided on Stud.IP.
Please note that this course is not available for the I-Module!

Literature
Austen, Jane. Northanger Abbey. 1817. Print.
Austen, Jane. Sense and Sensibility. 1811. Print.


zur Veranstaltung in Stud.IP